About Ghana

Ghana At A Glance

Pre Colonial Ghana

about-ghana

The Republic of Ghana is named after the medieval West African Ghana Empire. The Empire became known in Europe and Arabia as the Ghana Empire by the title of its emperor, the Ghana. The Empire appears to have broken up following the 1076 conquest by the Almoravid General Abu-Bakr Ibn-Umar.

A reduced kingdom continued to exist after Almoravid rule ended, and the Kingdom was later incorporated into subsequent Sahelian empires, such as the Mali Empire several centuries later. Geographically, the ancient Ghana Empire was approximately 500 miles (800 km) north and west of the modern state of Ghana, and controlled territories in the area of the Sénégal River and east towards the Niger rivers, in modern Senegal, Mauritania and Mali.

Historically, modern Ghanaian territory was the core of the Empire of Ashanti, which was one of the most advanced states in sub-Sahara Africa in the 18th–19th centuries, before colonial rule. It is said that at its peak, the King of Ashanti could field 500,000 troops. For most of central sub-Saharan Africa, agricultural expansion marked the period before 500. Farming began earliest on the southern tips of the Sahara, eventually giving rise to village settlements.

Toward the end of the classical era, larger regional kingdoms had formed in West Africa, one of which was the Kingdom of Ghana, north of what is today the nation of Ghana. Before its fall, at the beginning of the 10th century, Akan migrants moved southward then founded several nation-states including the first great Akan empire of the Bono founded in the 11th Century and for which the Brong-Ahafo Region of Akan land is named after.

Later, Akan groups such as the Ashanti federation and Fante states are thought to possibly have roots in the original Bono settlement at Bono manso. Much of the area was united under the Empire of Ashanti by the 16th century. The Ashanti government operated first as a loose network and eventually as a centralized kingdom with an advanced, highly specialized bureaucracy centered in Kumasi. By the end of the 16th century, most of the ethnic groups constituting the modern Ghanaian population had settled in their present locations. Join NMH Tourism to learn and explore more



Ghana Revolution and Political History

Political Highlights
1957 - independence, Nkrumah of CPP is PM
1960 - declared republic, one party system, presidential system
1966 - military overthrow of 1st republic
1969 - 2nd republic, Busia of PP is PM
1972 - military overthrow of 2nd republic
1978 - palace coup to restructure military government
1979 - junior officer uprising and military housecleaning
1979 - ushered third republic, Limann of PNP is President
1981 - overthrow of the constitutional PNP gov't by the PNDC military junta
1983 - Attempted overthrow of the PNDC junta by other junior army men
1992 - Rawlings of NDC is Dem elected as President
1996 - Rawlings of NDC is re-elected
2001 - Kuffour (NPP) is President
2005 - Kufuor begins second-term in office
2009 - John Evans Atta Mills (NDC) is President
2012 - John Dramani Mahama (NDC) is sworn in as President following death of President Mills

SUMMARY:
Multiparty System 20 years
Military System 21 years
One-Party System 6 years

Ghana lies at the heart of a region which has been leading sub-Saharan African culture since the first millennium BC in metal-working mining, sculpture and agriculture. But a long struggle still lay ahead - and the man who was the catalyst of that struggle Dr Kwame Nkrumah Born in 1909, Dr Kwame Nkrumah trained as a teacher at Achimota College in Ghana and then in the United States and Britain, where he obtained his degrees.

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